Giant Ground Sloth

 

Megatherium (/mɛɡəˈθɪəriəm/ meg-ə-theer-ee-əm from the Greek mega [μέγας], meaning "great", and therion [θηρίον], "beast") was a genus of elephant-sized ground sloths endemic to South America that lived from the EarlyPliocene[1] through the end of the Pleistocene.[2] Its size was exceeded by only a few other land mammals, including mammoths and Paraceratherium.

Sloth Teeth

Status

Size & Details

Price

Photo

Sloth 01

NEW!

 

Weighing in at 11.6 ounces this beautiful Giant Ground Sloth Tooth came from an adult Ground Sloth and has a biting surface that is 2 1/8 inches long and 1 3/4 inches wide, the tooth including root is 2 3/8 inches long.

Beaufort, S.C. 

 

$195

 

 

Sloth 02 NEW!

 

Weighing in at 11.1 ounces this beautiful Giant Ground Sloth Tooth came from an adult Ground Sloth and has a biting surface that is 1 1/4 inches long and 1 7/8 inches wide, the tooth including root is 2 1/2 inches long.

Beaufort, S.C.   

$195

 

 

Sloth 03 NEW!

 

Weighing in at 14.6 ounces this beautiful Giant Ground Sloth Tooth came from an adult Ground Sloth and has a biting surface that is 2 inches long and 1 1/2 inches wide, the tooth including root is 4 1/8 inches long.

Beaufort, S.C. 

$395  

 

Sloth 04 NEW!

 

Weighing in at 1 pound 4.6 ounces this beautiful Giant Ground Sloth Tooth came from an adult Ground Sloth and has a biting surface that is 2 inches long and 1 5/8 inches wide, the tooth including root is 5 inches long.

Beaufort, S.C.

 
$395  

 

Sloth 05 NEW!  Weighing in at 3.9 ounces this beautiful Giant Ground Sloth Jaw came from an adult Ground Sloth and is 4 inches long measured from one end of jaw to the other.

Aucilla River, FL

$550  

 

Sloth 06 NEW!    $  

 

 

Sloth 07 NEW!    $  
Sloth 08 NEW!      
Sloth 09 NEW!      
 
 
  1.  Saint-André, P. A.; De Iuliis, G. (2001). "The smallest and most ancient representative of the genus Megatherium Cuvier, 1796 (Xenarthra, Tardigrada, Megatheriidae), from the Pliocene of the Bolivian Altiplano." (PDF). Geodiversitas 23 (4): 625–645. Archived fromthe original (PDF) on 2013-10-29. Retrieved 14 April 2016.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
  2. ^ Jump up to:a b A. E. Zurita, A. A. Carlini, G. J. Scillato-Yané and E. P. Tonni. 2004. Mamíferos extintos del Cuaternario de la Provincia del Chaco (Argentina) y su relación con aquéllos del este de la región pampeana y de Chile. Revista geológica de Chile 31(1):65-87