Fossil Fish

  1. Prisca Cara: Prisca Cara is a genus of extinct freshwater fish that lived during the Eocene epoch, around 56 to 34 million years ago. These fish were part of the perch family and are known for their relatively flattened bodies. They had spiny dorsal fins and sharp teeth, indicating a carnivorous diet. Prisca Cara fossils have been found in North America, particularly in locations like the Green River Formation in Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah.
  2. Mocene Crab: It seems there might be a typo in the name you provided, as “Mocene” is not a recognized geological epoch. However, if you meant “Miocene,” this epoch occurred from approximately 23 to 5 million years ago. If you’re referring to a crab from the Miocene epoch, it could be a general term for various crab species that lived during that time. Crabs from this era would have likely resembled modern crabs in many ways, with adaptations for life in marine or brackish environments.
  3. Diplomystus: Diplomystus is an extinct genus of freshwater fish that lived during the Cretaceous and early Paleogene periods, around 66 to 50 million years ago. These fish had elongated bodies and were known for their large eyes. They are thought to have been predatory fish, feeding on smaller fish and aquatic organisms. Diplomystus fossils have been found in various parts of North America, particularly in the Green River Formation.
  4. El Kaid Erami Jellyfish: Fossilized jellyfish from Morocco, North Africa, are remarkable examples of ancient marine life preserved in the geological record. These fossils provide valuable insights into the prehistoric oceans and the organisms that inhabited them. The jellyfish fossils found in this region are often attributed to the Lagerst├Ątten of Morocco, where exceptional preservation conditions have allowed soft-bodied organisms like jellyfish to be fossilized in exquisite detail.
  5. Knightia: Knightia is a genus of small, extinct fish that lived during the Eocene epoch, around 56 to 34 million years ago. These fish are part of the herring family and are known for their slender bodies and forked tails, typical of many small schooling fish. They are often found in well-preserved fossil deposits, such as the Green River Formation in Wyoming, USA. Knightia fossils provide valuable insights into the prehistoric ecosystems and food webs of ancient freshwater environments.

Please note that scientific understanding can evolve over time with new discoveries, so if there have been any updates or new findings since my last update in September 2021, I might not be aware of them.

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